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The Last Notes

European Neanderthals, specialists in bone tools

European Neanderthals, specialists in bone tools

A research team from the Max Planck Institute of Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the University of Leiden in the Netherlands have found bone tools made by Neanderthals that have the characteristics of those used by modern man and are still used to work leather.

Different axes for different Neanderthal cultures

Different axes for different Neanderthal cultures

Dr. Karen Ruebens of the Center for Archeology of Human Origins (CAHO), with a grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, examined the design of 1,300 stone tools from 80 Neanderthal sites in five different countries (France, Germany, Belgium, Great Britain and the Netherlands).

The oldest game tokens dating back 5,000 years are found in Turkey

The oldest game tokens dating back 5,000 years are found in Turkey

These 5,000-year-old game tiles include 49 small stones of different shapes and colors. They could be the oldest found so far, according to Turkish archaeologists working on the Başur Höyük tombs from the Early Bronze Age. These tombs are located near Siirt in southeastern Turkey.

Ancient mask found in Turkey

Ancient mask found in Turkey

A team of researchers found a 2,000-year-old skeleton with a mask on its face in the ancient Aizanoi city in Kütahya (the Greek Kotyaion), during evacuations that began two years ago. Elif Özer, president of the excavation group at the University of Pamukkale Archeology reported that the excavations have been operational since 2011 and have provided numerous finds.

A hidden tunnel is found in Hadrian's Villa

A hidden tunnel is found in Hadrian's Villa

Italian archaeologists have found a hidden tunnel under Villa Adriano, near Rome. Thought to be part of a network of galleries and passageways possibly used by slaves in the service of the imperial palace, its size allows trolleys to transport food and other products between the different palaces.

Women's fashion has existed for 10,500 years

Women's fashion has existed for 10,500 years

Traces have been found that show that women cared about fashion to enhance their beauty 10,500 years ago. Researchers have discovered seals with geometric motifs that women put on their bodies, as well as beads that they wore around their necks and arms, these objects were found in tombs unearthed at the Boncuklu Höyük site of 10.

What happened to the ribbon of the Order of King Charles I of England?

What happened to the ribbon of the Order of King Charles I of England?

Anthony Van Dyck painted many portraits of King Charles I and his courtiers. The most famous of them is probably Charles I of England in three positions, a triple portrait that shows the king from the front, in the right profile and three-quarters of the left profile.In principle, the purpose of this portrait was to facilitate Bernini, who had been commissioned a bust of the king, to be able to access his features without counting on his presence.

Murals found in the hermitage of Santa Bárbara in Oveda

Murals found in the hermitage of Santa Bárbara in Oveda

The discovery of these murals took place while the roof of the hermitage was being prepared. These murals are relief paintings that show borders with plant motifs on the sides of the altar. Perhaps under them are more paintings and engravings from the time that it was a mosque, described Lola Zurano, who discovered the murals when she accessed the roof to take pictures of the church inside.

One mummy, many sarcophagi

One mummy, many sarcophagi

The ancient Egyptian elite used several coffins to bury their deceased, so that for each mummy there are more than eight coffins one inside the other. The goal was to ensure the transformation of the deceased to god, according to Anders Bettum, an Egyptologist at the Department of Culture of Languages ​​and Oriental Studies at the University of Oslo.

900-year-old African coins found in Australia

900-year-old African coins found in Australia

A series of over 900-year-old coins from Africa have mysteriously ended up in Australia. It is the mysterious story about the journey of nine 12th century Kilwa coins, found in 1944 in the Wessels Islands, which suggests that Australians visited these northern territories.

An ancient Greek shrine receives a late shipment

An ancient Greek shrine receives a late shipment

The Greek sanctuary will receive the 10-meter column after a 2,200-year wait. The shipment of this piece to Klaros, one of the three most important oracles of antiquity, took place more than two millennia ago, but could not be carried out due to the sinking of the ship that transported it near the Çeşme Peninsula.

The taste of our ancestors for spicy

The taste of our ancestors for spicy

Archaeologists from the University of York, in collaboration with colleagues from Denmark, Germany and Spain have found evidence of the use of spices in cooking during the transition to agriculture. These are specifically traces of garlic mustard in ceramics over 7,000 years old.Thanks to analysis through charred food found in containers in Denmark and Germany, traces of silicate from garlic mustard have been discovered together with animal waste.

2,300-year-old skeleton found in Austria

2,300-year-old skeleton found in Austria

Archaeologists from the Cetic Research Center in Roseldorf, in southern Austria have found a skeleton that exceeds 2,300 years old These skeleton remains have been found in excavations that lasted for two weeks and next to them the tip of a spear. After taking photographs, the pieces have been measured and registered and moved.

Collection of Mannerist prints at the National Gallery of Art

Collection of Mannerist prints at the National Gallery of Art

The National Galley of Art exhibits a spectacular selection of Mannerist prints by Ruth Cole and Jacob Kainen. The show has started on September 1 and will run until January 2014. The artists and their most relevant masterpieces are included, such as the early Mars and Venus by Hendrick Goltzius, the heroic dishes of Bellona, ​​by Jan Muller among others.

Medieval boat found in Norfolk

Medieval boat found in Norfolk

Archaeologists working in Norfolk have found medieval remains of a boat that could be 600 years old on the River Chet near Loddon. Originally, it would have been twenty feet long and could have a sail - the first time a medieval ship has been discovered in Norfolk, archaeologist Hather Wallis reports.

Byzantine monastery found in northern Sudan

Byzantine monastery found in northern Sudan

Polish archaeologists at Al-Ghazali in northern Sudan have found a Byzantine monastery, a large number of funerary pieces, and inscribed vessels. The researchers have prepared a documentation program based on geophysical investigations in addition to thousands of photographs to allow the preparation of an orthophotomap, consisting of a set of photographs taken from the air adjusted to scale and geographical coordinates.

They find evidence of a massacre in Ham Hill

They find evidence of a massacre in Ham Hill

Excavations at Ham Hill in Somerset have provided evidence of a massacre of hundreds of Iron Age people whose bodies were severed. These human remains found at an ancient site near Yeovil show cut marks, especially at major joints "such as if they had tried to separate the parts of the body ”, explains Dr.

The conflict over the first dynasty of Egypt

The conflict over the first dynasty of Egypt

For decades, experts have been embroiled in a conflict over dating Egypt's first dynasty. Upper and lower Egypt are believed to have developed a stable and unique ruler from 3,400 to 2,900 BC, thanks to information gleaned from burial sites and pottery remains.

A 3,000-year-old house found in Ecuador

A 3,000-year-old house found in Ecuador

French and Ecuadorian archaeologists have discovered in the province of Pastaza, in Ecuador, the remains of what appears to be a 3,000-year-old house. It appears to be the oldest residence in the Amazon region, according to the project chief told EFE. "We have found traces of ceramics, stones and stoves," said Stephen Rostain.

Roman burial urn found in Poland

Roman burial urn found in Poland

A burial urn and a crematorium pit from the 1st and 2nd centuries AD have been discovered. In the excavations of the Roman cemetery in Czelin, Poland, the director of the investigation, Bartłomiej Rogalski of the National Museum of Szczecin, stated that the shapes of the clay urn and the cogwheel are typical decorations from the Elbe area, west of the River Oder.